Can You Use a Drain Auger on a Toilet?

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Can you use a drain auger on a toilet? 

If you’re already got a drain auger at home, why buy a toilet auger? 

The differences will make you think twice about using a drain auger in your toilet. 


can you use a drain auger on a toilet
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Toilet or Closet Auger Vs a Drain Snake

If you have a clogged toilet with paper (or poop!), or the toilet water rises then slowly drains, you definitely need to get that solved ASAP! 

Forget about the home remedies of flushing vinegar in your toilet or unplugging your clogged toilet with baking soda.  Can I use drain cleaner in a toilet?  Drop that liquid plumber, it probably won't work.  Will bleach unclog your toilet?  NO! 

Most likely, you’ve got a foreign object lodged in your pipes, build up of hair and TP, or a poop party! 

You’re going to need an auger to unplug your toilet.  Why not use the drain auger you already have?   

We’ll tell you why you shouldn't! 

Toilet Auger

Drain Auger

For Toilets For Sink, Shower, Bathtub Drains
More expensive Cheaper
Breaks through clogs Pulls clogs out
Bulkier Smaller
More powerful Less powerful
Vinyl Porcelain Toilet Bowl Guard May scratch your bowl

Can You Use a Drain Auger on a Toilet? 

We recommend trying a plunger first, it will probably work any shallow clog out.   I find that it’s hard to get the plunger to make a seal on the low flow toilets that are in homes these days. 

Our advice is to buy both a drain auger and a toilet auger.  It’s always better to have the right tools for the job. 

Is a toilet auger the same as a snake?

No. Toilet augers are shorter and built with thicker, rotating cords that are designed with a special head to grab onto foreign objects in your toilet.  We explain the differences below so you know why you should use a toilet auger on your toilet and drain augers on your drains.

What is a Drain Auger? 

A drain auger is built specifically for drains.  The steel cord or “snake” on a drain auger is usually much longer than a toilet auger.   

The cord doesn’t have any protective vinyl or plastic around the steel because you are using it in drains.  There is no risk of scratching anything.   

Toilet augers come with a special vinyl protective casing to stop the porcelain in your bowl from getting scratched. 

Drain augers or drain snakes have a thinner cord than a toilet auger.  That’s because kitchen and bathroom drains are much smaller in diameter than your toilet drain.   

This means that while rotating your drain auger cord inside your toilet, you could tangle in up because there is too much room in the pipe. 

Drain augers are multipurpose and can be used in any drain in your house because they come with cords that are usually 25 to 50 feet long. 

What is a Toilet Auger? 

Toilet or closet augers are designed with a “head” on the end of the cord.  It can be shaped like a pear or a half pear.  The coiled up head pushes through clogs.   

It also retrieves and grabs foreign objects, so you can pull them out of your toilet pipes.  This is not the case with a drain auger.  

A toilet or closet auger vs a snake comes ready to get around the P trap in your toilet.  The smaller but specifically shaped head grabs onto objects as you rotate the cord.   

A snake is a straight piece of plastic that goes into your toilet bowl and can remove very basic clogs.

Toilet augers are great because they do double duty.  As your rotate your auger, it cleans up the insides of your pipes.  We recommend you rotate as much as you like while unplugging your toilet. 

Because of the shape of the pipes in your toilet (the U bends etc.) a toilet auger is designed to get passed those bends and right into the pipe to clear your clog. 

​Conclusion 

Can you use a drain auger on a toilet?  You really shouldn't.

If you need to get your toilet cleared quickly, get a toilet auger.  Especially if you have a large family and/or small children. 

If you are absolutely desperate because you only have 1 toilet, you can go for it.  Just be careful not to kink up the cord on your drain auger, or scratch your toilet bowl.

Quick Auger FAQs

How do you unclog a toilet with an auger?

Place the auger against the hole in your toilet bowl and push it down the pipes until it stops. Rotate and continue to push until it grabs the clog. Rotate the auger to make sure it’s grabbed the clog and then pull the auger out.


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